65 thesis

Nolte has little regard for specific historical context in his treatment of the history of ideas, opting to seek what Carl Schmitt labeled the abstract "final" or "ultimate" ends of ideas, which for Nolte are the most extreme conclusions which can be drawn from an idea, representing the ultima terminus of the "metapolitical". [28] For Nolte, ideas have a force of their own, and once a new idea has been introduced into the world, except for the total destruction of society, it cannot be ignored any more than the discovery of how to make fire or the invention of nuclear weapons can be ignored. [32] In his 1974 book Deutschland und der kalte Krieg ( Germany and the Cold War ), Nolte wrote there was "a worldwide reproach that the United States was after all putting into practice in Vietnam, nothing less than its basically crueler version of Auschwitz".

One cannot consider the issue of corporate worship without first considering the question of why people worship at all.  It would seem, in the words of Marva Dawn’s book, to be A Royal Waste of Time.   Yet, the general existence of worship rituals in all known cultures testifies to the importance of worship to Mankind.  Evelyn Underhill states that worship, in its simplest form, is “an acknowledgment of Transcendence; that is to say, of a Reality independent of the worshipper, which is always more or less deeply coloured by mystery, and which is there first.”   The acknowledgement of this mysterious and independent reality has revealed itself in countless customs and rituals.  Ronald Byars suggests that this natural craving for ritual is actually instinctive in humans.
No examination of a culture is complete apart from a study of that culture’s ritual patterns and ceremonies.  Since Man is both spirit and flesh, there seems to be an innate drive to enflesh worship through the use of signs, symbols and ceremonies.  The employment of these elements has by nature a social quality, thereby creating ritual, which Underhill defines as “an agreed pattern of ceremonial movement, sound or verbal formula, creating a framework in which corporate religious action can take place.”
Hebrew ritual, in particular, is well documented, with the lyrics to their music still preserved , giving a living glimpse into some of the various motivations and methods of their worship.  In the Psalms we see processionals, liturgical responses, songs and prayers.  The rituals of a particular people seem to reveal what they believe about their gods, and what their responsibilities are in light of that belief.  Because Christianity is the fulfillment of the Jewish anticipation of a Messiah, Hebrew worship provides a natural foundation for the consideration of the essentials of Christian worship.  As background for this study, I will briefly review four motivations for Jewish worship: covenant obligation; appropriate response; obedience to the command to praise; and, finally, the purpose of human existence.

The Internet and the World Wide Web are often seen as part of a new "electronic frontier," with profound implications for the future of communications, the society and the economy. The slogan "the Internet is free" echoes the "free land" mantra of the Turner thesis. Indeed, opposition to pay walls and subscription services resembles the pioneer quest for free land unencumbered by ownership claims. Scholars analyzing the Internet have often cited Frederick Jackson Turner's frontier model. [29] [30] [31] Of special concern is the question whether the electronic frontier will replicate the stages of development of the American land frontier. Wikipedia is a major presence on the electronic frontier, and the Wikipedia editors have been explicitly compared to the pioneers of Turner's American frontier in terms of their youth, aggressiveness, boldness, equalitarianism and rejection of limitations. [32]

65 thesis

65 thesis

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