Ny times photo essays

Second, count the balls. Assume recycling. Imagine 3 pics. Before stacking (), after stacking (on), and after removal for recycling (). Imagine say 30 balls visible on the hill and in the gully in . After stacking balls on the road this number falls to say 20. Ten balls will be on the road, or more due to addition of balls from off-frame. After recycling, the ten plus road balls will be gone and possibly some additional balls from the gully, so say 15 to 20 balls visible. Compare off to on pics. If the number of balls off the road in the off pic is greater than the number of balls off the road in the on pic, then off is and it is the first picture. If the opposite if true then off is and it is the second pic. If the number is the same then we can’t say anything for sure, but haphazard recycling seems less likely.

Lens is the photojournalism blog of The New York Times, presenting the finest and most interesting visual and multimedia reporting -- photographs, videos and slide shows. A showcase for Times photographers, it also seeks to highlight the best work of other newspapers, magazines and news and picture agencies; in print, in books, in galleries, in museums and on the Web. And it will draw on The Times's own pictorial archive, numbering in the millions of images and going back to the early 20th century. E-mail us tips, story suggestions and ideas to lens@.

Ny times photo essays

ny times photo essays

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