Pursuit of beauty essay

Rejecting a technology is perfectly valid if what is available is unsuitable for the conditions expected over the life of the “mission” (sorry couldn’t find a better word there). My best argument against the rejection of GPS/Radar/etc, is that those are technologies just like sails are a technology (sails have simply been around a lot longer). I find no end-game to the argument to simply not use something because we might be capable of doing without, because eventually you can justify just swimming across the pacific (hopefully during an el-nino with lots of food floating around). Now, if someone offers you a gadget that is expensive and will only work until it gets wet, obviously that’s worth rejecting. But if someone gave you a box of sticks that when arranged in a square made a GPS receiver, and spares were smaller than pencils and cheaper than paper, you’d probably say yes. We keep sails because they survive a lot of sun and water, and can be rather easily repaired. We often (properly) reject expensive instrument networks because they’re unreliable and complicated. I’m suggesting that the electronic hacker portion of the internet is mature enough that all on-board electronics of your average high-end coastal cruiser could be replaced by inexpensive and small electronic platforms that hackers use every day. I’m suggesting that the electronics involved in making those instruments work are just as simple and easy to repair as sails these days, if you approach the problem from the perspective of a sailor.

Pursuit of beauty essay

pursuit of beauty essay

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